Baseball History for December 7th

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS:

1847 Deacon White
1849 Elmer White
1863 Tom Lovett
1865 Charles Yingling
1867 Joe Burke
1874 Hobe Ferris
1885 Ducky Yount
1886 Bobby Schang
1895 Bud Davis
1899 Ed Morris
1901 Ralph Judd
1906 Tony Piet
1911 Denny Galehouse
1911 Don Johnson
1915 Vinnie Smith
1915 Johnny Gee
1916 Jorge Comellas
1926 Armando Roche
1927 Dick Donovan
1930 Hal Smith
1930 Mark Freeman
1935 Don Cardwell
1936 Bo Belinsky
1941 Rupe Toppin
1942 Alex Johnson
1947 Johnny Bench
1950 Rich Coggins
1951 Paul Dade
1955 Scot Thompson
1956 Ozzie Virgil
1963 Billy Bates
1963 Jim Austin
1963 Steve Howard
1963 Shane Mack
1967 Tino Martinez
1972 Carl Dale
1973 Brian Schmack
1974 Mike Bell
1976 Kevin Hooper
1977 Saul Rivera
1977 Eric Chavez
1979 Ryan Theriot
1984 Mike Baxter
1989 Kyle Hendricks
1990 Brian Johnson
1990 Steve Baron
1990 Yasiel Puig

OBITUARIES:

1893 Johnny Lavin
1928 Charlie Petty
1933 Fred Hoey
1938 Tom Kearns
1940 Harry Eells
1947 Jud Smith
1953 Slats Jordan
1959 Tom McGuire
1962 Bobo Newsom
1964 Bill Karlon
1969 Lefty O’Doul
1974 Red Dorman
1976 Duke Maas
1977 Denny Sothern
1980 Luke Urban
1984 Howie Reed
1986 John Bogart
1987 Ken Richardson
1990 Lew Flick
1994 Frank Sacka
2010 Cardell Camper
2010 Art Mahan

YOU SHOULD HAVE BEEN THERE!!!

1939 Lou Gehrig is elected to the Hall of Fame, as the five year waiting period had been waived on his behalf.

TRANSACTION WIRE:

1937 Boston sends Dom Dallassandro, Al Niemiec and cash (and later Spence Harris) to San Diego of the PCL to purchase outfielder Ted Williams.

1946 Cleveland sends Gene Woodling to Pittsburgh for Al Lopez.

1969 Milwaukee sends Ray Oyler and Diego Segui to the Athletics for George Lauzerique and Ted Kubiak.

1973 New York acquires Lou Piniella and Ken Wright from Kansas City for the low price of Lindy McDaniel.

Boston bought Juan Marichal from San Francisco.

Milwaukee bought Felipe Alou from the Expos.

St. Louis sent Reggie Cleveland, Diego Segui and Terry Hughes to the Red Sox for Lynn McGlothen, John Curtis, and Mike Garman.

1977 Baltimore sends Rudy May, Bryn Smith, and Randy Miller to the Expos for Gary Roenicke, Don Stanhouse, and Joe Kerrigan.

1979 Detroit sends Ron LeFlore to Montreal for Dan Schatzeder. Meanwhile, Cleveland sends Bobby Bonds to the Cardinals for John Denny and Jerry Mumphrey.

1980 St. Louis signs free agent catcher Darrell Porter.

1983 A three team trade between San Diego, Montreal, and Chicago moves Scott Sanderson to the Cubs, Gary Lucas to the Expos, and Craig Lefferts and Carmelo Martinez to the Padres (among other guys).

1984 Atlanta signs free agent reliever Bruce Sutter, the Cubs sign Steve Trout, and the Mets send Walt Terrell to Detroit for Howard Johnson.

1988 Texas signs free agent pitcher Nolan Ryan.

1992 Toronto signs free agent hitter Paul Molitor.

1995 Seattle trades Tino Martinez, Jeff Nelson, and Jim Mecir to the Yankees for Russ Davis and Sterling Hitchcock.

2000 The Yankees sign free agent Mike Mussina.

2005 Florida sends outfielder Juan Pierre to the Cubs for Ricky Nolasco, Sergio Mitre, and Renyel Pinto.

2017 Miami sells off Dee Gordon (and some international bonus money) to the Mariners for three minor leaguers (Robert Dugger, Nick Neidert, and Christopher Torres).

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Baseball History for October 8th

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS:

1857 John Bergh
1858 Jim Conway
1862 Charlie Manlove

Briefly played for the Giants in the National League and Altoona in the Union Association in 1884. He got three hits with Altoona, but none in ten at bats for the Giants. From what it looks like, he was an infielder and occasional outfielder, despite what the clipping from 1925 says, or his obituary.

While still playing locally, Manlove Had been added to the Pennsylvania League list of substitute umpires…

“Charlie Manlove will make a good umpire…”

“Some Newsy Notes.”, Altoona Tribune, 14 May 1892, Page 1.

Charlie Manlove arden [SIC] baseball booster and former catcher of the New York Giants is to assume the managerial reins of the Gables City League team, with the opening game of the second playing cycle. The selection of Mr. Manlove will prove a popular move as Charlie has never lost interest in the game which he, himself, played so deftly.

Since taking the defunct Irving-King franchise, Gables have been without official leadership. Red Plowman, catcher and captain, has satisfactorily performed this duty but the need of a capable business and bench manager has long been felt…”

“Charlie Manlove to Pilot Gable Crowd”, Altoona Tribune, 20 July 1925, Page 11.

Charles H. Manlove, 89, retired Altoona businessman and former professional baseball player, died Tuesday.

Manlove played baseball for Richmond, Va., and Reading and Altoona, Pa., before joining the New York Giants as a catcher in 1884. He entered the cigar business when his playing days ended. Manlove was a native of Philadelphia.

“Former Player Dies”, The Gazette and Daily (York, PA), 14 February 1952, Page 27.

1863 Jimmy Peoples
1870 Tom Colcolough

Thomas Bernard Colcolough was a Charlerston, SC native (1870 to 1919) who pitched for the Pirates from 1893 to 1895 and got a second shot with the Giants in 1899.

“Tom Colcolough was yesterday released by the Pittsburg club. He was given a thorough trial, but proved wanting in nerve. In a minor league, Tom will be the top of the heap. There, the batters are impatient and bang at everything in sight. In the National League, the batters are more careful and deliberate, and this is the cause of Tom’s poor showing this season. Colcolough was secured by the Pittsburg blub in 1893, along with Joe Sudgen, from the Charleston Club. In that year, he pitched three games for the Pittsburg team, winning two. Last year he won eight games and lost five. This year he pitched three full games, winning one and losing two.”

“Two New Pitchers.”, Pittsburgh Daily Post, 04 June 1895, Page 6.

“Tom Colcoloiugh, the Charleston, S. C., pitcher, gained his first reputation as a boxman of more than the average ability while playing with the team managed by Denny Long, at Charleston, in 1893. Before the close of the season, Colcolough and Joe Sugden were sold to Pittsburgh for $1,500… His father his a wealthy man at Charleston, and Tommie always remains near the “little red smokehouse” during the winter.”

Blake, Percy H., “Southern Boys in Base Ball.”, Nashville Tennessean, 19 December 1897, Page 25.

“Tom Colcolough has been added to the pitching staff of the New York team, and it is very probable that he will be signed as a regular member of the club before the team returns home. With his valuable assistance to-day the players were given the benefit of some of the best batting practice they have yet had. Colcolough (pronounced Coakley) has an arm like iron, and he shot the ball around the shins and the pates of the New Yorkers like a Mauser bullet.

“Colcolough has been doing a little practice during the winter, and consequently his arm was in good condition, and he says he can stand the pace he started in without danger. He resides in Charleston, and was one of the pitchers of the Pittsburgh club as late as two years ago. When Manager Watkins took charge of the Pirates he allowed the Wilkes-Barre club, of the Eastern League, to secure Colcolough;s services. His lack of control was his chief fault, although he won many good and close games…”

“Tom Coakley. The Old Wilkes-Barre Pitcher Puts Up a Bold Front at Charleston”, Dollar Weekly News (Wilkes-Barre), 25 March 1899,┬áPage 5.

“Ex-Pitcher Tom Colcolough – once a Pirate – as bobbed up as an alderman in Charleston, S. C.”

“National League News.”. The Hutchinson Daily Independent, 23 February 1905, Page 6.

According to census data (1900, 1910) and his death certificate, Tom was the son of James and Ellen (Kelly) Colcolough, who were Irish immigrants. After his baseball career wound down, he married Annie Bernadine and later owned a poultry store. They had three children (Marguerite, Thomas (Jr.), and James). In 1919, Tom was working as a welder at the naval yard when he succumbed to a heart attack on 10 December 1919. Annie, who was eleven years younger than Tom, would remarry years later and passed away in 1968.

1884 Larry McClure
1885 Johnny Lush
1887 James Otis “Doc” Crandall
1887 Larry Pratt
1887 Dennis Berran
1887 Frank Stephen “Ping” Bodie
1887 Owen Joseph “Donie” Bush
1890 Walter Tappan
1891 Monte Pfeffer
1891 Doug Neff
1895 Ed Wingo
1896 Tim Murchison
1902 Paul Schreiber
1910 Wally Moses
1913 Lee Rogers
1916 Joe Callahan
1916 Rex Cecil
1917 Hal Toenes
1917 Danny Murtaugh
1919 Bob Gillespie
1920 George Metkovich
1929 Bob Mabe
1934 Mickey Harrington
1942 Bill Landis
1943 Don Pepper
1944 Ed Kirkpatrick
1946 Mike Wegener
1946 Paul Splittorff
1946 Ralph Gagliano
1948 Rick Stelmaszek
1948 Bernie Williams
1949 Enos Cabell
1955 Jerry Reed
1956 Jeff Lahti
1957 Bob Skube
1957 Mike Chris
1959 Bryan Little
1959 Mike Morgan
1959 Jack Hardy
1965 Jimmy Kremers
1966 Jay Gainer
1967 J. T. Bruett
1970 Olmedo Saenz
1970 Sandy Martinez
1970 David Doster
1971 Joe Ayrault
1972 Willie Adams
1975 Andy Thompson
1978 Keith Reed
1983 Antoan Richardson
1985 Cody Eppley
1986 Adron Chambers
1986 Erik Davis
1989 Taylor Featherston
1990 Robbie Erlin

OBITUARIES:

1905 Bill Sullivan
1912 Heinie Heitmuller
1913 Elmer Cleveland
1934 Bill Snyder
1936 Red Ames
1948 Al Orth
1952 Joe Adams
1957 Paul Russell
1962 Ralph Head
1969 Willie Ramsdell
1971 Murray Wall
1973 Raymond Haley
1976 John Bottarini
1978 Jim Gilliam
1980 Lloyd Johnson
1981 Bill Nagel
1982 Bill Meehan
1986 Max Surkont
1988 Boob Fowler
1988 Bob Boken
1991 Ed Hanyzewski
2002 Jodie Beeler
2004 Johnny Sturm
2004 Tony Giuliani
2005 Swede Larsen
2006 Ivan Murrell
2008 Les McCrabb
2010 Dale Roberts
2013 Andy Pafko

YOU SHOULD HAVE BEEN THERE!!!

1908 The Cubs top the Giants, 4 – 2, in a make up game to win the National League Pennant.

1922 The Giants top the Yankees in game five to win the World Series.

1927 The Yankees clobber the Pirates in game four – sweeping the World Series.

1929 Howard Ehmke was a surprise starter, and Mack’s decision worked as Ehmke fanned 13 Cub batters in a 3 – 1 victory.

1939 The Yankees sweep the Reds – in the tenth inning, Ernie Lombardi is run over by Charlie Keller and Joe DiMaggio score while Lombardi was shaking out the cobwebs.

1956 Don Larsen throws a perfect game, topping the Dodgers, 2 – 0.

1959 Los Angeles finishes off the White Sox in six games.

1977 Tommy John tops Steve Carlton and the Phillies for a series clinching win for his Los Angeles Dodgers.

1995 Edgar Martinez doubles home Ken Griffey, Jr. to complete a comeback to beat the Yankees in the ALDS.

TRANSACTION WIRE:

1936 St. Louis sends Ripper Collins and Roy Parmalee to the Cubs for Lon Warneke.

1963 St. Louis signs amateur pitcher Steve Carlton.

2008 Kansas City signs amateur pitcher Yordano Ventura.

Baseball History for September 15th

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS:

1847 Jim Snyder
1855 Ed Hengel
1856 Doc Bushong
1858 Charles Strick
1861 Ed Flanagan
1862 Elmer Cleveland
1863 Jack Brennan
1868 Frank O’Connor
1874 George Rohe
1876 Nick Altrock
1881 Slow Joe Doyle
1887 Harry Suter
1888 Jean Dubuc
1892 Harry Lunte
1893 Speed Martin
1895 Hugh McQuillan
1899 Harry McCurdy
1900 Bud Clancy
1900 Roy Meeker
1902 Russ Young
1905 Henry Peploski
1905 Vance Page
1906 Charlie Biggs
1906 Tip Tobin
1907 Fritz Ostermueller
1919 Mike Budnick
1920 Dave Garcia
1924 Jim Davis
1927 Duke Simpson
1928 Bob Lennon
1929 Lee Wheat
1933 John Fitzgerald
1936 Freddie Burdette
1937 Charley Smith
1938 Gaylord Perry
1940 Frank Linzy
1941 Jim Barbieri
1949 Don Carrithers
1949 Dave Pagan
1950 Dave Hilton
1952 Don Collins
1956 John Pacella
1960 John Christensen
1960 Todd Fischer
1965 Satoru Komiyama
1966 Doug Simons
1967 Paul Abbott
1967 Dennis Moeller
1968 Rich Robertson
1969 Herbert Perry
1971 Jason Hardtke
1975 Dan Smith
1975 Javier Cardona
1976 Matt Thornton
1976 Elvis Pena
1977 Damian Rolls
1983 Luke Hochevar

OBITUARIES:

1912 Al Barker
1922 Charlie Jones
1924 Frank Chance
1926 Danny Richardson
1932 Harry Kane
1935 Joe Ardner
1940 Ed Yewell
1946 Tex Wilson
1949 Heinie Beckendorf
1949 Tiny Bonham
1950 Joe Knotts
1953 Seth Sigsby
1957 Max Butcher
1958 Snuffy Stirnweiss

He was riding in a CRRNJ commuter train when it ran through an open drawbridge and fell through the open Newark Bay Bridge.

1961 Leon Carlson
1963 Ray Miner
1971 Roberto Ortiz
1978 Larry Bettencourt
1981 Earl Caldwell
1991 Smoky Burgess
1993 Ethan Allen
1995 Nap Reyes
1996 Andy Pilney
2010 Al LaMacchia
2011 Bill Taylor
2015 Randy Wiles

YOU SHOULD HAVE BEEN THERE!!!

1890 Ledell “Cannonball” Titcomb tosses a no- hitter for Rochester, topping Syracuse, 7 – 0.

Speaking about pitching!

Ledell Titcomb, with his muscular south paw, showed the red legged Syracuse Stars a few things yesterday about the art they they never dreamed of. For nine long innings they stepped up to the plate and banked away at the ball in the hope of getting at least a base hit. But Titcomb was too artful for them. They couldn’t touch him. He was unapproachable, incomparable, out of sight. Titcomb’s work in the box has been equaled but once in this city in the history of base ball, and but very few times in the country; last year big Ed Cushman, of the Toledos, let Rochester down without a hit, but he gave more bases on balls than did Titcomb. It was a wonderful game that he pitched. He had perfect control, great speed, and used his curves with telling effect. There were but few people there, about 700, because of the inconvenience of getting to the grounds, but that 700 saw something about which they will talk for seasons to come.

Titcomb’s pitching was not the only feature of the game by a long shot. The fielding of the Rochesters was something phenomenal, Knowles and Smith doing work that time and again brought the crowd to their feet. Smith ate up three or four base hits, and Knowles was not far behind him. Then in the outfield Sandy Griffin and Harry Lyons did some star work. All in all the Rochesters played ball that would have beaten any club in the country. The Stars fielded very well but they could do absolutely nothing with Titcomb. They had but one may on third base and one on second.

In the second, Grim made one of his old time three baggers and came in on Smith’s single. In the second Lyons made a two bagger and came in on Knowles’s single. In the third, with Sheffler on third and Grim on second, Smith hit to Childs, Sheffler started home but was caught on the lines. In the meantime, Grim and Smith were close to second. Smith started back but was caught. But Grim got home during the excitement. In the sixth, Sheffler got a base on balls, went to third on a wild throw by Mars and scored on Grim’s single. In the eighth Fields made a single, stole second and scored on Smith’s single. Greenwood got a base on balls and Titcomb made a hit on which Smith scored. Greenwood with to third and came home with Pitz threw wild to third base.

“Titcomb’s Great Pitching.”, Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, 16 September 1890, Page 6.

1969 Steve Carlton fans 19 batters to set a new 9-inning record. Carlton got the loss, though, as the Mets topped St. Louis, 4 – 3.

1971 Larry Yount, Robin’s brother, injures his shoulder during warm ups in what was supposed to be his first professional appearance. He had to be replaced – and never officially appeared in a major league game.

TRANSACTION WIRE:

1913 Detroit drafts Harry Heilmann from Portland in the Northwestern League in the Rule 5 Draft.

1915 The Yankees draft Urban Shocker from Guelph of the Canadian League in the Rule 5
Draft.

Baseball History for September 14th

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS:

1864 Al Schellhase
1887 Harry Redmond
1890 Walt Marbet
1893 John Kelleher
1893 Dutch Ruether
1893 Mike McNally
1894 Sam Crane
1894 Dink O’Brien
1896 Art Stokes
1896 Pat Collins
1896 Roy Wilson
1897 Eddie Rommel
1898 Curt Fullerton
1903 Rabbit Warstler
1906 Thornton Lee
1906 Jim Levey
1907 John Campbell
1908 Otho Nitcholas
1915 Morrie Aderholt
1916 Roy Zimmerman
1931 George Susce
1934 Tom Hughes
1938 Bob Heffner
1939 Tom Parsons
1945 Rick Wise
1947 Mike Adamson
1949 Jim Obradovich
1949 Rick Dempsey
1951 Tom McMillan
1954 Billy Smith
1954 John Harris
1955 Mike Fischlin
1963 Rodney McCray
1964 Greg Hibbard
1965 Steve Curry
1967 Rod Correia
1968 Erik Bennett
1968 Bernie Williams
1968 Denny Neagle
1969 Russ Davis
1971 Brent Brede
1971 Armando Rios
1972 Nelson Cruz
1972 Chan Perry
1976 Wade Miller
1977 Grant Roberts
1980 Daisuke Matsuzaka
1981 Justin James
1982 Rickie Weeks
1983 Andy LaRoche
1984 Jesse English
1985 Luke French
1988 Andy Wilkins
1991 Zach Lee

OBITUARIES:

1917 Gene Derby
1918 Ernie Beam
1933 Joe Harrington
1945 Cy Blanton
1946 Ed Gagnier
1947 Ed Lennon
1949 Tim Jordan
1952 Al Clauss
1953 Wese Callahan
1954 Roy Grimes
1960 Ralph Mattis
1966 Ralph Comstock
1967 Joe Stanley
1967 Ralph LaPointe
1970 Lee Riley
1973 Vince Barton
1973 Johnny McCarthy
1979 Hap Ward
1980 Charlie Pechous
1999 Bill Lohrman
2001 Jorge Comellas
2003 Johnny Welaj
2009 Lonny Frey
2012 Jack Pierce
2013 Dan Osinski
2014 Frank Torre

YOU SHOULD HAVE BEEN THERE!

1923 First baseman George Burns completes an unassisted triple play. The Red Sox fielder snags a liner, tagged the runner coming from first, and outran a base runner back to second base.

1990 Ken Griffey and Ken Griffey Jr. hit back to back homers off of Angels pitcher Kirk McCaskill.

2008 The Astros, relocated due to a hurricane, lose a home game in Milwaukee to the Cubs as Carlos Zambrano throws a no-hitter.

TRANSACTION WIRE:

1970 Oakland sent Jim “Mudcat” Grant to the Pirates for Angel Mangual.

Baseball History for September 13th

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS:

1864 Al Schellhase
1887 Harry Redmond
1890 Walt Marbet
1893 John Kelleher
1893 Dutch Ruether
1893 Mike McNally
1894 Sam Crane
1894 Dink O’Brien
1896 Art Stokes
1896 Pat Collins
1896 Roy Wilson
1897 Eddie Rommel
1898 Curt Fullerton
1903 Rabbit Warstler
1906 Thornton Lee
1906 Jim Levey
1907 John Campbell
1908 Otho Nitcholas
1915 Morrie Aderholt
1916 Roy Zimmerman
1931 George Susce
1934 Tom Hughes
1938 Bob Heffner
1939 Tom Parsons
1945 Rick Wise
1947 Mike Adamson
1949 Jim Obradovich
1949 Rick Dempsey
1951 Tom McMillan
1954 Billy Smith
1954 John Harris
1955 Mike Fischlin
1963 Rodney McCray
1964 Greg Hibbard
1965 Steve Curry
1967 Rod Correia
1968 Erik Bennett
1968 Bernie Williams
1968 Denny Neagle
1969 Russ Davis
1971 Brent Brede
1971 Armando Rios
1972 Nelson Cruz
1972 Chan Perry
1976 Wade Miller
1977 Grant Roberts
1980 Daisuke Matsuzaka
1981 Justin James
1982 Rickie Weeks
1983 Andy LaRoche
1984 Jesse English
1985 Luke French
1988 Andy Wilkins
1991 Zach Lee

OBITUARIES:

1917 Gene Derby
1918 Ernie Beam
1933 Joe Harrington
1945 Cy Blanton
1946 Ed Gagnier
1947 Ed Lennon
1949 Tim Jordan
1952 Al Clauss
1953 Wese Callahan
1954 Roy Grimes
1960 Ralph Mattis
1966 Ralph Comstock
1967 Joe Stanley
1967 Ralph LaPointe
1970 Lee Riley
1973 Vince Barton
1973 Johnny McCarthy
1979 Hap Ward
1980 Charlie Pechous
1999 Bill Lohrman
2001 Jorge Comellas
2003 Johnny Welaj
2009 Lonny Frey
2012 Jack Pierce
2013 Dan Osinski
2014 Frank Torre

YOU SHOULD HAVE BEEN THERE!!!

1883 – One Armed Hugh Daily no-hits Philadelphia, 1 – 0. Daily lost his left hand in a gun accident…

1925 Dazzy Vance, on the heels of a one-hitter, fires a no-hitter to beat Philadelpha, 10 – 1.

1936 Bob Feller fans 17 – at 17-years-old. Everybody is taking advantage of Philadelphia – this time, the As.

1973 Tito Fuentes becomes the seventh person to be hit by a pitch three times in the same game.

2006 Gary Matthews, Jr. keys an 11 – 3 win for the Rangers by hitting for the Cycle against Detroit’s Justin Verlander and Mike Maroth.

TRANSACTION WIRE:

1958 Philadelphia signs amateur free agent Lee Elia.

1960 Philadelphia signs amateur free agent pitcher Mike Marshall.

1983 Milwaukee purchases Mexican League pitcher Teddy Higuera.

1985 New York signs amateur free agent outfielder Bernie Williams.

Baseball History for September 12th

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS:

1840 Nick Young
1851 Frederick Ehlen
1855 Jud Birchall
1867 John Dolan
1875 Bill Cristall
1875 John Gochnaur
1880 Boss Schmidt
1884 Bob Groom
1885 Fred Luderus
1885 John Quinn
1888 Patsy McGaffigan
1891 Pepper Peploski
1894 Ole Olsen
1903 Len Dondero
1907 Spud Chandler
1907 Ollie Bejma
1908 Jim McLeod
1916 Ralph Hamner
1916 Charlie Keller
1917 Russ Christopher
1918 Al Libke
1920 Andy Seminick
1924 George Bradshaw
1924 Bubba Church
1925 Stan Lopata
1926 George Freese
1928 Len Matarazzo
1929 Tom Herrin
1933 Dave Stenhouse
1934 Albie Pearson
1940 Mickey Lolich
1940 Rich Barry
1943 Floyd Wicker
1947 John Montague
1953 Greg Keatley
1956 Mark Thurmond
1957 Mario Ramirez
1959 Scotti Madison
1960 Trench Davis
1963 Keith Hughes
1963 Mike Roesler
1967 Pat Listach
1968 Masao Kida
1969 Hilly Hathaway
1970 Tito Navarro
1975 Luis Castillo
1975 Mark Johnson
1980 Sean Burroughs
1980 Maicer Izturis
1980 Kevin Richardson
1981 Franquelis Osoria
1982 Carmen Pignatiello
1983 Clayton Richard
1986 Steve Garrison
1986 Kyle Weiland
1989 Freddie Freeman
1991 Jose Urena
1992 Andrew Faulkner
1992 Matt Wisler

OBITUARIES:

1881 Chub Sullivan
1905 Billy Taylor
1915 Ormond Butler
1931 Pop Dillon
1935 Ed Beecher
1945 Cy Pieh
1945 Dave Zearfoss
1949 Sherry Smith
1951 Lave Winham
1955 Dick Adkins
1956 Tod Sloan
1957 Homer Thompson
1966 Parson Perryman
1967 Rollie Zeider
1968 Don Rudolph
1968 Charles Conway
1969 Ed Schorr
1973 Bernie Boland
1975 Augie Johns
1980 Ole Olsen
1985 Steamboat Struss
1986 Jim Shilling
1990 Jim Romano
1993 Granny Hamner
1994 Hunter Lane
2007 Lou Kretlow
2015 Alex Monchak

YOU SHOULD HAVE BEEN THERE!!!

1962 Tom Cheney goes the distance, all 16 innings, to beat the Orioles, 2 – 1. The Senator pitcher strikes out a record 21 batters.

1976 The 53-yearold Minnie Minoso clocks a hit off of Sid Monge – the oldest man to get a hit in MLB history.

TRANSACTION WIRE:

1963 Washington purchases Ken Hunt from the Angels.

1967 Cincinnati signs amatuer free agent infielder Dave Concepcion.

1974 Cleveland trades a player to be named later to the Angels for Frank Robinson, who
would become a player-manager.

Baseball History for September 11th

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS:

1851 Mike Golden
1858 Mike DePangher
1864 Con Daily
1868 Steve Brodie
1869 Frank Kitson
1876 Frank Moore
1881 Bill Hogg
1886 Ed McDonough
1889 Howard McGraner
1890 Harry Damrau
1892 Ernie Koob
1893 Roy Grimes
1893 Ray Grimes
1901 George Loepp
1901 Monroe Mitchell
1905 Glenn Spencer
1910 Les Tietje
1914 Clay Smith
1916 Ellis Clary
1918 Randy Heflin
1919 Barney Olsen
1924 Lou Grasmick
1926 Eddie Miksis
1933 Bob Davis
1934 Marlan Coughtry
1940 Jackie Hernandez
1941 Larry Bearnarth
1944 Dave Roberts
1947 Larry Cox
1948 Jeff Newman
1953 Mike Gordon
1958 Don Slaught
1958 Brad Lesley
1964 Ellis Burks
1965 Quinn Mack
1969 Eduardo Perez
1969 Shannon Penn
1973 Tom Davey
1976 Edwards Guzman
1978 Junior Herndon
1979 Frank Francisco
1980 Matt DeSalvo
1983 Jacoby Ellsbury
1985 Bobby Cassevah
1986 Andrew Cashner
1986 Kyle Blanks
1987 Brandon Laird
1988 Mike Moustakas
1989 Zeke Spruill
1990 Shawn Armstrong

OBITUARIES:

1905 Jerry McCormick
1915 John Carbine
1920 Bill Hallman
1925 Pat Duff
1931 Carl Sitton
1931 Joe Marshall
1936 Braggo Roth
1943 Kid Durbin
1946 Cy Morgan
1953 Bob Coulson
1956 Marty Herrmann
1960 Charlie High
1961 Chink Outen
1963 Ham Hyatt
1964 Red McDermott
1966 Bill Cramer
1971 Rube Melton
1973 Del Baker
1978 Snipe Hansen
1978 Mike Gazella
1980 Garth Mann
1980 Ernie Ovitz
1980 Harry Hulihan
1983 Bill McCarren
1984 Paul Carter
1986 Otho Nitcholas
1998 Larry Bradford
2001 Vince Ventura
2001 Clem Dreisewerd
2012 Bruce Von Hoff

YOU SHOULD HAVE BEEN THERE!!!

1912 Eddie Collins is the first player to record six stolen bases in a game.

1936 Hod Lisenbee gives up 26 hits and 17 runs in a complete game loss (8 innings) to the White Sox. Luke Appling, Mike Kreevich, and Zeke Bonura all had five hit games. It’s the second most hits allowed in a game (Eddie Cicotte allowed 29 in 17 innings), and the seventh most runs allowed in a game by a pitcher.

1942 and 1966… Paul Gillespie and John Miller homer in their first MLB at bats. What makes this cool is that both also homered in their LAST at bats three seasons later – the only two players to home in their first and last plate appearances.

1974 The Cards beat the Mets, 4 – 3, in 25 innings. The game lasts seven hours and four minutes – and 202 batters came to the plate that day…

1985 Pete Rose punches an Eric Show pitch into left center for a single – the 4,192nd hit of his career – to pass Ty Cobb and become the all time hit king.

1991 Kent Mercker, Mark Wohlers, and Alejandro Pena combine to throw a no-hitter to beat San Diego, 1 – 0.

1999 Twins pitcher Eric Milton tops the Angels without allowing a hit and fanning 13 batters.

TRANSACTION WIRE:

1901 The Chicago Orphans (now Cubs) purchased Davy Jones from Rockford.

1961 Houston signs amateur free agent Rusty Staub.

1964 Los Angeles signs amateur free agent pitcher Don Sutton.

1973 Philadelphia signs amateur free agent pitcher Willie Hernandez.