Baseball History for May 30th

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS:

1864 George Proeser
1869 Tony Von Fricken
1870 John Fitzgerald
1870 Charlie Frank
1871 Amos Rusie

The Hoosier Thunderbolt – the power pitcher of his day, held out for money while with the Giants, which cost him a season and he never seemed to regain his form after that. Then, he was traded to Cincinnati for a kid named Christy Mathewson. Spent much of the end of his days working as a press box attendant at the Polo Grounds.

1873 Archie Stimmel
1878 Mike Donlin

Turkey Mike – a player with an interesting life, worthy of a book. Spent two years trying to make it in show business, for example… If I can’t find that book, I should write it.

1879 Jesse Whiting
1881 Tom Dougherty
1884 Rube Oldring

Might be the only baseball “Rube” named Reuben.

1885 John Misse
1894 Al Mamaux
1894 Howard Earle “Twink” Twining

One game pitcher in 1916 – but it was merely a pit stop on the way to becoming a doctor…

There was a Clarence “Twink” Twining – which means there were two of them… Clarence was an amateur basketball star in the Pacific Northwest in the 1920s.

This Twink (I once saw “Twig” in an article about a game he won over Penn in college) was captain of his baseball team while at Swarthmore. A Pennsylvania native (born in Horsham, died in Lansdale), he managed to pitch in one game in 1916 for the Reds. He got in two innings of work, gave up three hits (including a homer), walked one, and beaned one – accounting for three runs. Brooklyn’s Jimmy Johnston got that homer – he batted lead-off that day (9 July 1916) and homered in the ninth, his only homer of the season.

Retrosheet.org

Twink was also called “Doc.” This nickname frequently appeared in a few articles covering semi-professional games in which he pitched – because he was a doctor. More on that in a paragraph… In 1921, he helped Glenside win the Philadelphia Suburban League for the first time in 14 seasons, striking out 16 in the pennant clincher.

“Glenside Clinches Suburban Pennant”, Philadelphia Inquirer, 31 July 1921, Page 21.

After his flirtation with baseball was over, Twining got down to business – he graduated from the Hahnemann Medical College, then went to Vienna to complete training in Dermatology. He was much more successful there – a member of the Pennsylvania Acacemy of Dermatology, and the head of dermatology at the Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital before his retirement. (He was also a 32nd Degree Mason…) Howard Earle married Josephine Smith and they remained a happy couple until his death in 1973.

“Howard Twining, 78, Hahnemann Doctor”, Philadelphia Inquirer, 17 June 1973, Page 30.

1897 Wally Kimmick
1902 Lou McEvoy
1906 Hugh Willingham
1922 Bob Hooper
1924 Turk Lown
1926 Dixie Upright

R. T. (need to find out what that stands for) – but no relation to Dudley Do-right.

1935 Ed Rakow
1936 Mel Nelson
1941 John Miller
1942 John Felske
1946 Mike Sadek
1956 Jay Loviglio
1956 Mike LaCoss
1961 Jim Steels
1968 Mike Oquist
1970 John Courtright
1972 Scott Eyre
1972 Manny Ramirez

He has a phrase, but not a nickname.

1978 Rico Washington
1980 Mark Kiger
1981 Reggie Willits
1983 Jairo Asencio
1983 Jae Kuk Ry
1984 Frank Herrmann
1985 Tony Watson
1985 Fernando Salas
1986 Tony Campana
1990 Eury Perez
1990 Zach Wheeler

OBITUARIES:

1914 Frank Diven
1932 Tom Lipp
1933 Burley Bayer
1942 Ed Burns
1946 Billy Earle
1959 Doc Tonkin
1960 George Hildebrand
1963 Joe McDonald
1966 Dick Ward
1970 Howie Gregory
1973 Jim Breton
1975 Bert Cole
1976 Max Carey
1979 Joe Smaza
1982 Johnny O’Connor
1982 Charlie Gooch
1983 Harry Weaver
1991 Jim Magnuson
1994 Jack Krol
1995 Glenn Burke
1999 Clarence Heise
2008 Ray Hoffman
2015 Lennie Merullo

YOU SHOULD HAVE BEEN THERE!!!

1894 Bobby Lowe of Boston is the first player to hit four homers in a game, all off of Elton Chamberlain.

1927 Cub Jimmy Cooney grabs a Paul Waner liner, steops on second to double up Lloyd Waner, and then tags Clyde Barnhard to complete an unassisted triple play.

1939 Pittsburgh’s Johnny Rizzo smacks a pair of homers among his five hits, drives in nine runs, and leads the Pirates to a 14 – 8 win over the Cardinals in the second game of a double header.

1943 The All-American Girls Professional Baseball League opens with a game between Rockford and Racine.

1977 Dennis Eckersley fires a no-hitter as Cleveland edges the Angels, 1 – 0. Tony Solaita walked, and Bobby Bonds reached on a dropped third strike, but was eliminated immediately when Don Baylor grounded into a double play. Umpire Bill Deegan worked his second no-hitter behind the plate in 16 days (Jim Colburn).

TRANSACTION WIRE:

1912 Pittsburgh sends Tommy Leach and Lefty Leifield to the Cubs for King Cole and Solly Hofman.

1930 The Yankees send the aging Waite Hoyt and Mark Koenig to the Tigers for Ownie Carroll, Harry Rice and Yats Wuestling.

1985 Cleveland sends Johnnie LeMaster, who they had JUST acquired in a trade, to Pittsburgh for a player to be named later (Scott Bailes).

 

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