Happy Birthday, Twink Twining

Howard Earle Twining was a one game pitcher in 1916 – but it was merely a pit stop on the way to becoming a doctor…

(There was a Clarence “Twink” Twining – which means there were two of them… Clarence was an amateur basketball star in the Pacific Northwest in the 1920s.)

Born May 30, 1895, this Twink (I once saw “Twig” in an article about a game he won over Penn in college) was captain of his baseball team while at Swarthmore. A Pennsylvania native (born in Horsham, died in Lansdale), he managed to pitch in one game in 1916 for the Reds. He got in two innings of work, gave up three hits (including a homer), walked one, and beaned one – accounting for three runs. Brooklyn’s Jimmy Johnston got that homer – he batted lead-off that day (9 July 1916) and homered in the ninth, his only homer of the season.

Retrosheet.org

Twink was also called “Doc.” This nickname frequently appeared in a few articles covering semi-professional games in which he pitched – because he was a doctor. More on that in a paragraph… In 1921, he helped Glenside win the Philadelphia Suburban League for the first time in 14 seasons, striking out 16 in the pennant clincher.

“Glenside Clinches Suburban Pennant”, Philadelphia Inquirer, 31 July 1921, Page 21.

After his flirtation with baseball was over, Twining got down to business – he graduated from the Hahnemann Medical College, then went to Vienna to complete training in Dermatology. He was much more successful there – a member of the Pennsylvania Acacemy of Dermatology, and the head of dermatology at the Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital before his retirement. (He was also a 32nd Degree Mason…) Howard Earle married Josephine Smith and they remained a happy couple until his death in 1973.

“Howard Twining, 78, Hahnemann Doctor”, Philadelphia Inquirer, 17 June 1973, Page 30.

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One response to “Happy Birthday, Twink Twining

  1. Pingback: Baseball History for June 14th | Mighty Casey Baseball

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