Baseball History for March 4th

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS:

1856 Clarence Cross

Played a handful of games as an infielder with three different teams in the Union Association, then went back into the minors where he moved around from team and league to team and league.  In 1887, he wound up in Eau Claire, WI where he hit about .387 and was called out to New York for a tryout with the Metropolitans of the American Association.  He played in 16 games, batted .200 and was put on the reserve list – only for his team to be purchased by Charles Byrnes and incorporated into the Brooklyn entry in the American Association.  He didn’t stick and wandered around a variety of minor league teams at least until 1890 – playing with Spokane Falls that season.

I found him in the 1870 and 1930 US Census records.  In 1870, he was living with his mother, Catherine Crause (wife of Henry, who was not listed), and three siblings.  He and an older brother, Charles, were both working as apprentices for a chair maker in St. Louis, the city where he was born.  Somewhere between then and the early 1880s, he changed his baseball name from Crause to Cross.  In 1930, I found him boarding with a family in Meadville, MT, which was a copper mining town.  He didn’t have a job listed, but the census taker recorded that he was now divorced from a woman he married around 1882.  A year later, he died in Seattle and was cremated.  His death certificate noted his parents but no living next-of-kin.

“Base Ball”, New Orleans Times-Picayune, 26 September, 1884, Page 8.
“A Surprise For Brooklyn.”, New York Sun, 30 October 1887, Page 11.
“Scraps of Sport”, St. Paul Globe, 25 April 1890, Page 5.
Washington State Death Certificates
1870 and 1930 US Census
Baseball Reference

1858 Emil Gross
1861 Abe Wolstenholme

Born on the day that Abraham Lincoln was sworn in as our 16th president, Abraham Lincoln Wolstenholme played in three games as a catcher and third baseman for about a week in June, 1883 for the Phillies – the first year of Philadelphia’s National League existence. He had one hit in eleven at bats, a double, over those three games. After that, he was gone. As Philadelphia had a pretty extensive semi-professional circuit then, he may have been active in local games for a portion of his adult life.

From simple research, he was born to John and Alice (Heargrave) Wolstenholme in 1861, though his death record says he was born in 1862. He was the fourth child (behind Jeremiah, Sarah, and Elizabeth). Not long after his baseball career ended, he married Maggie Evans on 2/4/1884 and spent most of his days as a file cutter, his last job was with the Forman File Works. In the 1900 and 1910 census, he was living without his wife – either with his parents (1900) or as a lodger. You don’t want to read too much into this, as she signed his death certificate, but I don’t see any records (city directories, etc.) that show them living together much, or that they had any children.

Wolstenholme is one of a handful of players (and people, really) who died on his birthday (see OBITUARIES, below), passing to the next life on 4 March 1916 and is buried in the family plot at North Cedar Hill Cemetery. The cause of his death was uremia complicated by nephritis – essentially kidney failure.

1862 Tom Gunning

Bill Lamb wrote the biography of Gunning, a fair enough catcher who became a doctor and happened to be one of the people who participated in the autopsy of Lizzie Borden’s parents.

1863 Jack Wentz
1863 Al McCauley
1864 Jack Bellman
1865 Joseph Herr
1870 Bill Whitrock
1874 Jim Korwan
1880 Lefty Herring
1883 Chet Spencer
1884 Red Murray
1887 Fred Herbert
1888 Jeff Pfeffer
1890 Johnny Enzmann
1890 Earl Tyree
1891 Jose Acosta
1891 Dazzy Vance
1895 Jesse Baker
1897 Lefty O’Doul
1897 Neal Brady
1899 Dutch Kemner
1902 Emmet McCann
1913 Bill Hart
1914 Art Rebel
1917 Clyde McCullough
1918 Mel Queen
1919 Les Mueller
1924 Jack Brittin
1926 Cass Michaels
1933 John Easton
1936 Bob Johnson
1939 Jack Fisher
1946 Danny Frisella
1947 Bruce Miller
1948 Tom Grieve
1948 Leron Lee
1951 Sam Perlozzo
1954 Mark Wagner
1958 Lorenzo Gray
1960 Jeff Dedmon
1964 Tom Lampkin
1966 Andy Mota
1968 Brian Hunter
1968 Giovanni Carrara
1969 Ed Giovanola
1969 Lee Tinsley
1970 John Dettmer
1970 Dave Stevens
1971 Nerio Rodriguez
1972 Bruce Aven
1973 Brian Barber
1974 Tommy Phelps
1976 Hiram Bocachica
1980 Jack Hannahan
1983 Sergio Romo
1985 Michael McKenry
1985 Cory Luebke
1987 Dan Cortes
1988 Ryan Strausborger
1988 Jose De Paula
1989 Rubby De La Rosa
1992 Nick Castellanos

OBITUARIES:

1886 Tom Lee
1916 Abe Wolstenholme
1917 Joe Dowie
1918 Lon Ury
1925 John Montgomery Ward

Yes – his birthday was March 3rd.

1938 Jack Taylor

Blustery pitcher around the turn of the century – actually pretty good, but didn’t suffer fools easily.

1942 Jack Hammond
1955 Doc Reisling
1956 Frank Kelliher
1962 George Mogridge
1963 Jess Cortazzo
1966 Jack Niemes
1967 Bullet Rogan
1968 Duke Reilley
1972 Watty Clark
1974 Les Sweetland
1983 Kiddo Davis
1992 Larry Rosenthal
1993 Bill Antonello
1994 Louis Brower
2012 Don Mincher
2014 Chuck Kress
2015 Steve Shea

YOU SHOULD HAVE BEEN THERE!!!

2004 Bud Selig announces that baseball will celebrate Jackie Robinson day each April 15th in every ballpark.

TRANSACTION WIRE:

1924 The White Sox trade Shano Collins and Nemo Leibold to Boston for Harry Hooper.

1968 The Giants sign non-drafted free agent Elias Sosa.

1999 The Cubs sign non-drafted free agent Hee-Seop Choi.

2008 The Dodgers sign free agent Manny Ramirez.

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